A New High Wire Act Along New Hampshire Roads
Wednesday, January 4, 2012 at 10:00AM
Cara Snider in BTOP, Broadband, Broadband Developments, FairPoint:FRP, Fiber Deployment, Industry Trends, Wireless Broadband

Sometimes when we discuss the need for broadband in remote or rural areas, it's easy to forget just how much work it takes and how many hours are necessary to complete a fiber build-out. As a case in point, consider New Hampshire, where this winter residents will see more than just snow along the road. There, crews are working demanding hours for Network New Hampshire Now (NNHN), hanging fiber from already-existing telephone poles. Last week, Seacoast Online reported that the BTOP-funded, 750-mile fiber network was “moving into the next phase,” thanks to diligent work and considerable man-hours. But the project is taking time, thanks to a complicated build-out process that involves “stringing cables from pole to pole to pole—over 750 miles in cities, suburban streets and back woods—a lot of hours spent in 'bucket trucks' doing the physical work, but just as many [crew members] figuring out how the cables can fit on the poles, which are owned either by the electric company or telephone company.”

As a public-private consortium, NNHN oversees the $65m project, with $44.5m in grants from the federal stimulus package and $21m in matching funding from other sources. It's an ambitious and far-reaching broadband initiative that, according to NNHN, will “ensure that residents of ten counties in New Hampshire will be able to plug into a powerful future with internet connectivity.”

There are three main components of the network: the middle-mile fiber backbone, last-mile fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP), and a closed middle-mile public safety microwave network.

The middle-mile network will stretch all across the Granite State—from the Seacoast, across the more populated southwest, up to the northwest, and all the way to the remote North Country and mountainous Lakes Region. NNHN says it will “place network access points in or near existing central telephone office locations along the path, allowing all commercial broadband providers to potentially leverage the fiber optic network build across the state regardless of protocol, service or technology.” This portion of the broadband network is being overseen by University of New Hampshire Information Technology—a leader in the initiative.

A variety of partners are coming together to provide last-mile connectivity through what NNHN is deeming an “innovative model called FastRoads,” which will provide fiber-optic connectivity in 35 communities in the southwest part of the state. According to NNHN, these 35 communities translate into 1,300 homes and businesses.

Finally, a closed middle-mile microwave network called NHSafeNet will be made available for public safety, public television, transportation and mobile broadband communications on mountaintops across New Hampshire covering 3,800 square miles.

As with any statewide broadband initiative, the list of partnerships for NNHN is quite long. Last April, Chelmsford, Massachusetts-based Waveguide announced that it would “provide engineering and construction services,” along with New Hampshire Optical Systems, based in Nashua. Additionally, Green Mountain Communications is constructing NHSafeNet, along with other state organizations and departments.

But, despite good planning and an impressive assembly of partners, the issue of actual, physical work remains. And it takes time.

Waveguide president Rob Carmichael described the process of preparing for and hanging fiber to Seacoast Online last week: "We have a right to the space, but the space has to be made available. First we do a survey, walk the pole line with both utilities. We look at the pole, take measurements, engineers in the field decide on this one, power can move up, phone can move down, cable TV can be rearranged, whatever is needed, then you'll have space," he said. "There are no unique issues, other than the timelines. Building 750 miles in this time period is fast.” Completion date for the network is slated for June 30, 2013.

Of course, in addition to deadlines and man-hours in the cold, the network has also faced criticism from existing providers in the area. FairPoint Communications has already built a similar fiber backbone in the area, which it uses to provide its DSL service. In more populated areas like Nashua, in the southern part of the state, FairPoint's FAST provides fiber-to-the-home for residents. But in many “overlooked” regions of the mountainous state, there is no fiber connectivity.

With an impressive scale, NNHN's 750 miles of fiber is just one of many New England fiber builds, as Vermont, Massachusetts, and Maine are all stringing fiber to underserved areas of their states. In Maine alone, 1,100 miles of fiber will crisscross the state, connecting businesses and residents who cannot currently get high-speed service.

But just like in New Hampshire, these networks, too, will be completed in difficult terrain, in a variety of weather—one measurement, one survey, and one cable line rearrangement at a time. No faster.

Article originally appeared on JSI Capital Advisors (http://jsicapitaladvisors.com/).
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